Streaks and Losses

Harvard Squash at National Championship.   Before attending Harvard, I knew very little about the sport of squash. I’d heard the name, knew that some people, somewhere played it, but had never really spent much thought on it; that was before I met Saad. We connected over a common dorm, Holworthy, and right in the middle of sharing more about his background from Egypt, he casually mentioned squash. Little did I know that Saadeldin Aish was one of the top squash players in the entire world and was soon to be Harvard’s #1 court player.  And thus, in my first …

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Act Like It

Harvard urged to take responsibility as a political actor. By HUNTER RICHARDS With the 2016 election and changing of power, Harvard students called on their university to provide support in resisting potential policies that would hold negative consequences on a larger scale. While student groups of all kinds have been taking cause to heart on the political front for years, the University has typically chosen to refrain from being a political actor. However, as one of the most prominent and powerful institutions, Harvard has social and political power and influence that cannot be ignored. Immigration Only recently have community members …

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Winter Games

Harvard Varsity teams continue play over break and into spring. By TUSHAR DWIVEDI While many of us visited family and home, traveled, worked, or learned, it is easy to forget the number of students who represented Harvard in winter athletics over break. These athletes, such as Holworthy resident Zeth Dean, stayed in what effectively became oversized singles, while continuing practice and competition for their respective sports. For Zeth, that meant wrestling. According to Zeth, “One thing I realized was that staying over break really helped me focus all of my time on wrestling and allowed me to improve. I also …

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Strike 1

The unfortunate saga of Harvard and its Dining Services. It may appear that the strike by Harvard’s dining services employees has subdued in the last week. Appearances can indeed be misleading. As the university has tried to ensure that meals in the dining halls grow in quality as the strike wears on—understandably so, given the the initial displacement in the supply-chain—it has given some students the false impression that the impact of the strike on their lives has gotten progressively minimal. In fact, the last couple of days have seen the most substantial developments in negotiations between the leaders of …

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By (User) Design

The Harvard Library presents newest research tool. The first thing I notice upon entering the room is a set of large posters on the wall. The next is a sheaf of pamphlets. Then, I notice the stack of business cards on the desk in front of me. I’m here to notice things, and to have people notice what I notice, which is harder to do than one might assume. How can user experience be quantified? This is the work of the Harvard Library User Research Center. I’m at the URC to participate in a study on the design of a …

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Concentration Conversations

Freshmen and faculty go through Advising Fortnight.     Despite the last snow on the first day of the season, it seems that all of the traditional signs of spring have finally arrived. Daffodils and other early bloomers can be spotted around the campus. Allergies have returned, if measured by the trumpeting of a thousand noses and the sprouting of HUHS flyers in the dining hall. Changing wardrobes are heavily supplemented by pajamas worn to Lamont as the second wave of midterms and papers arrives. Finally, of course, Advising Fortnight has begun. Whereas the fall was heralded with sophomore concentration …

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Salman Rushdie at Harvard

The Indy reports on the world famous author’s recent visit to Harvard.   Standing before a church gathering and asking people to “treat religion with the contempt it deserves” is not everyone’s cup of tea. Unless, of course, you are Salman Rushdie. Last Monday, Cantabrigians had the chance to spend an evening with the Booker-Prize winning author, as he read excerpts from his new book, Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights. Rushdie makes for a highly contentious figure in the part of the world from which I hail. It is rare to meet an educated Indian who takes to Rushdie’s …

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Harvard Gallops Ahead

BY CAROLINE CRONIN Club Polo at Harvard grows. This past weekend marked the annual alumni celebration and polo tournament for the Harvard Polo Club. If you need clarification, I am talking about polo on horses with mallets and helmets, and not the rather pedestrian diversion in which boys and girls flail about in water wearing silly caps. It was the event of the season, and I am truly sorry for those of you who were unable to attend. Balls flying, horses galloping, young men and women strutting about in those tight, oh-so-flattering, impeccably white pants — indubitably a most jovial …

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New Varsity Blues

BY SEAN FRAZZETTE Women’s Rugby starts season with a tough loss. Last season, in their first every season as a varsity program, Harvard’s Women’s Rugby cruised through the Ivy League with little difficulty, eventually winning the conference championship and qualifying for the National Tournament. Coming off such a high-octane season has placed high expectations on the Crimson, who lost a number of key contributors to graduation and injuries. Nevertheless, led by captains Brooke Kantor ’15, Kaleigh Henry ’15, and Hope Schwartz ’16, as well as returning head coach Sue Parker, Harvard’s newest varsity program has been practicing for weeks to …

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Science Technology 101

BY HANNAH KATES A day at the Biotech fair. The Harvard Biotechnology Club held its twelfth annual Career Fair this past Thursday. Attendees visiting the recruiting tables on the third floor of the medical school’s Longwood building had the opportunity to speak to representatives from over twenty-one companies in biotechnology and related fields. Young, well-dressed graduate students and post-docs armed with informed questions and stylish suits crowded (politely) around tables handing out informational pamphlets, emblazoned pens, and opportunities in biotechnology and healthcare ranging far beyond conventional lab jobs. Though it felt professional, the fair also felt dynamic, energetic and comfortable. …

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Campuses Past

BY ANDREW LIN A brief recitation of the history and development of the American college campus. With the conclusion of another summer, scores of fresh-faced new freshmen and grizzled veteran upperclassmen are now streaming through the variegated buildings, green spaces, and common areas of Harvard’s various educational domains. The basic portrait of these spaces, as conceived by students and the public alike, is one that seems almost archetypal: ivy-bedecked brick-and-marble Colonial and neo-Classical shrines to learning, with the occasional Richardsonian gem or concrete modernist edifice thrown into the mix. Amidst the hustle and bustle of choosing courses and extracurriculars (COMP …

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Heating Up

BY PEYTON FINE Crimson win three games and advance to the Beanpot Finals. The first half the Harvard baseball team’s season has not been kind. However, some warmer weather at home may be just what the doctor ordered to heat up the Crimson. In a five-game week, the Crimson amassed three of their eight total wins this season in just this weekend. The team is now advancing to the finals of the Beanpot Tournament. Last week’s games began on Wednesday against Boston College for the team. The Crimson fell behind early when Boston College opened the game with four runs …

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