Yardfest feat. VagueHandGestures

Performers we don’t have to wait for. By HUNTER RICHARDS   There’s only a little over a week left until Yardfest, but the College Events Board has yet to announce who will be performing. We haven’t felt this played since Frank Ocean strung us along until giving us hope with that livestream of him building an Ikea desk. With all the rumors of who might be coming or who might have canceled, it’s not hard to understand why Harvard students have so many trust issues. While we’re all starting to feel like Yardfest is a social experiment or that past …






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A Season to Remember

Crimson Hockey reinvigorated despite final loss. By TUSHAR DWIVEDI   Recently, my hometown of Chicago has been abuzz in the world of hockey. With the rise and prominence of the Blackhawks, a new pride has enveloped the city that not just complements, but often overrides the typical baseball, basketball, and football interests. However, while I have not been to United Center, Chicago’s prime hockey and basketball stadium, in almost a year, the Harvard’s men’s ice hockey team just returned from their visit. This visit, however, was far beyond the ordinary. The team was representing Harvard in the Frozen Four for …






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Open Campus Initiative Shakes Up College Life

A new organization holds first event. By EMILY HALL   The new organization brought controversial professor Jordan Peterson to campus Monday, despite backlash from other student groups. On Monday evening, new student organization the Harvard College Open Campus Initiative hosted its first event on campus. They hosted Dr. Jordan Peterson, a professor at the University of Toronto who has recently come under fire for a video series decrying political correctness, in an event titled “Mask of Compassion: Postmodernism & Neomarxism in Modern Times.” The group, which consists of a small number of students who have come together to promote free …






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Burning Bridges

And Summer Bridge Programs. By HUNTER RICHARDS   As a first generation student, pre-orientation programs didn’t quite make sense to me. I was attracted to Dorm Crew, which offered me a way to make quite a bit of money before the semester started. Being low-income, I worried about being able to do the same things I heard my roommates were interested in doing. Before I had even gotten to campus, I already had to decline my roommate’s invitation to a concert because I couldn’t afford the tickets. I could only imagine what else I would have to turn down, even …






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Engage!

An afternoon with Drew Faust. By CAROLINE CRONIN & PULKIT AGARWAL   The Inclusion and Belonging Task Force at Harvard has been met with a variety of reactions this year. Its origins are muddied by the ongoing debate on administration enforced sanctions relating to single gender social organizations and the perceived hypocrisy of many of the University’s actions. However, on Wednesday April 5, University President Drew Faust held a 3 hour-long event in Sanders Theater to expound on the ideals and aims of the Task Force. Since the Task Force’s creation by Faust in September 2016, it has been operating …






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“But Where are You From From?”

 Reflections from a confused expatriate. By FRANCESCA CORNERO I have come to disconnect my brain from my words every time I answer the question of where I am from. No matter whether I tell you I am Italian, which means I want this conversation to end as quickly as possible, or whether I tell you I am Mexican, which means I am feeling patient, or whether I explain the story of my life; at this point I feel nothing but exhaustion for the epic I need to tell in order to account for all the pieces. When I get asked …






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The Inadequacy of Honesty

A world without hypocrites and frauds isn’t a world at all. BY DAN VALENZUELA For some reason whenever I set out to write this column, I feel as though I have a moral duty to present an authentic self with honest arguments that come from my heart and mind. This admission, however, seems to do little to convince you that I am in fact honest in my arguments, given all you have to go on is my word. So I’ll offer this: I am desperately trying to be honest about my honesty. Yet this second admission, like the first admission, …






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The Future of Politics

Public Service in the Age of Trump By EMILY HALL   In the wake of 2016’s presidential election upset, have Harvard students changed their minds about public service? The answer seems to be a qualified “no”.   Last November’s shocking electoral triumph of now President Donald Trump over former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was unexpected at Harvard, to say the least. Political operatives were caught off guard by the electoral result, and the administration is still far from full. Harvard graduates seem to be prime candidates for positions in the executive branch, and when Hillary was anticipated to win …






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Expectations on My Dream School

A Reflection. By HUNTER RICHARDS   When my mom came to visit me for Junior Parents Weekend, she wanted to see the buildings I spend most of my time in for classes. “That’s Pierce: I have my physics class there on Tuesdays and Thursdays. That’s Maxwell Dworkin: I took Fluids there last year. That’s the Science Center: I took biochemistry in there freshman year.” Unfortunately, it’s harder to lie to my mom in person than it is when she’s 800 miles away.   My mom wasn’t on campus for more than 6 hours before I pointed out where I was …






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The High Functioning Trap

More than what you produce. By ANONYMOUS   Standing in an empty kitchen in an apartment in Brookline, my boyfriend and his new roommate talk about their experiences with hospitalization. They swap programs, talk about partial hospitalizations and residential stays. I stay silent. Somehow, despite being actively suicidal several times a week throughout high school and self-harming on and off for six years, I managed to avoid ever being hospitalized. Always stopping on the edge something that would be majorly self-destructive, something that would get noticed.   My therapist finally mentioned recently that I probably have Borderline Personality Disorder, confirming …






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Competition and Balance

Mental health in athletics. By TUSHAR DWIVEDI   The buzzwords of “mental health” and “athletics” typically evoke thoughts of concussions, CTE, and other such forms of physical injury to the brain; examples in professional sports abound, and recent attention has highlighted the impact of new research in football specifically. When watching sports on TV, reading about them in the news, or hearing of injury on ESPN, it is simple to limit the definition of mental health, especially when considered in the context of athletics. However, playing the sport, or even watching it in person, conjures a new realization.   The …






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Dancing with Fire

Annie Opel ‘ 17, likes to play with fire. No, I’m not talking about lighting up matches just to watch them burn like a crazed pyromaniac. Nor am I talking about the metaphorical sense of that expression. She is a fire dancer, and she can literally light up a room (figuratively speaking, of course — or else that would be a fire hazard!) It all started during her gap year between high school and Harvard. For the second half of the year, Annie moved to St. Croix, one of the U.S. Virgin Islands, to intern for the Nature Conservancy. When …






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On the Rails

Why the country isn’t going off track. BY DAN VALENZUELA For spring break this year I visited the only college in America that could figuratively say it’s older than Harvard: the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. Fifty-seven years after Harvard’s founding, William & Mary was officially chartered in 1693. In 1618, however, the original plan for the college that would eventually become William & Mary was made by the Virginia Company of London, before the Pilgrims made land at Plymouth. In this way, William & Mary could be said to be older than Harvard. However, a devastating …






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