To Autumn

The equinox upon us. By CAROLINE CRONIN The 22nd of September this year marks the Autumnal Equinox. The equinox is the time at which the astronomical season of autumn begins. An astronomical season is defined and measured by the alignment of the stars and planets, and not – as in a meteorological season – by the average temperatures of given months.  Though we have been at our green ivy-covered college for almost a whole month, the beginning of the fall season is only now upon us (and that ivy will soon grow red). To be precise, the equinox names the …

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Engi-Queering: the SWUG Chronicles

Volume 1: S.O.S. (“Suffering of Seniors”) By HUNTER RICHARDS By senior year, I’m retired from my wild days. Or, more accurately, I’m just plain tired. I’ve finally grown into the title “SWUG,” or “Senior Washed-Up Girl,” and it fits better than the first pair of leggings I bought in college that convinced me to toss all my jeans out. Personally, I believe that “SWUG” is not fully inclusive. For starters, “Senior” implies that I haven’t been entirely done with this institution (both Harvard and the practices of “going to college” and “existing”) since I stepped foot onto campus during Opening …

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World Domination & Politics  

Fall at the IOP. By MALCOLM REID Starting off the year at a brisk sprint, the IOP has already gotten into the swing of activities and forums for students with unabashed rigor. For any unfamiliar with the IOP, just as the best writers flock to the Harvard Independent, so too do the future politicians of Harvard find their way to the Institute of Politics. In essence, if one is looking for a future Anthony Eden – or a future Colonel Gaddafi – it’s a good place to start. However, a notable part of the charm of the IOP is that …

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Tantalizingly Far from Right

Harvard’s missed opportunity with Michelle Jones. By PULKIT AGARWAL Michelle Jones’s admission to the PhD program in Harvard’s history department was rescinded earlier this month, causing a worried student body and faculty to question the university’s commitment to its mission. As per the original story covered by the New York Times, Ms. Jones was by no means an ordinary candidate. While the university has previously accepted students who have a history of having been incarcerated, Jones’s case stands out for she carried out her scholarship while still in prison, serving a twenty-year sentence for having murdered her 4-year old son. …

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Sleepy Poem

Tired eyes and tired faces Walk along to tired places Early yet, we shuffle and sway It’s only the beginning of a boring day But moments ago, or so it seems We were all alone in dreams Weightlessness and breathy breaths Something close to bliss and death Each night we lay our heads to rest Or morning, noon, our eyes would suggest “A nap” we’d say, and lay bodies down “A nap” would end in yawns and frowns For when you let sleep creep in He’ll consume you from within Suddenly you’re paralyzed No alarm, sound, or push could revive …

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Dreaming of La Reunion

By MEGAN SIMS Last night I dreamt I drove to La Reunion,  a defunct socialist utopian colony on the Trinity River, which has always to me seemed less river, more repository, more gaping concrete scar across the city of Dallas. The bridges they build to cross the ugly thing are beautiful. I dreamed of traffic. I had to cross through people, rivers, columns of a place I knew for some might seem like La Reunion’s legacy. But I feared it. I was searching for the cemetery thinking there I might find the ghosts of past somebodies or the place I …

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Shana Tova

Religion among the intelligentsia. By ALAYA AYALA Picture this: You’re sitting in class discussing a novel that you were assigned to read. The conversation is going great, everyone is making great points, and the ideas are flowing. Then someone brings up the moral implications of the novel. Suddenly, the conversation isn’t going as well. Left and right, your peers are stating their opinions, starting off with “well, I’m not religious, but…” or “Well, I am religious, and…” There’s nothing wrong with what is being said, in fact, people are still making good points. The problem is the tension in the …

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An Author in Adams

The Indy sat down with student author Briuana Green to talk about her new book, The Fall, and what’s going to happen next. By EMILY HALL If five years ago, you’d told Briuana Green ’18 that she’d be a published author before graduating college, she might not have believed you. But today, she’s exactly that. Originally from Arkansas, Briuana came to Harvard without any concrete plan of how she’d write a book, but she had known for a while that she wanted to eventually. What she didn’t realize was that during her sophomore year of college, her sister’s new high …

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Yardlings in Power

Freshmen elected to the UC get to work! By JILLY CRONIN Last Friday at noon, the elections for the Undergraduate Council closed, and the freshmen representatives – new to both the UC and to Harvard – were announced. Three students from each of the Freshman Yards were elected. The results are as follows: Crimson Yard: Rushi Patel Sonya Kalara Ifeoma White-Thorpe Elm Yard: Emma Robertson Jackson Walker Jordan Silva Ivy Yard: Seth Billiau Swathi Srinivasan Wilfried Zibell Oak Yard: Abby Scholer Ivan Vazquez Luke Kenworthy It is generally expected that those who have left the dwelling of the Yard for …

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This Time Next Year 

I will snap my driver’s license in two and try to forget  where it came from. I won’t smile in my next photo.  I will stop being palatable to the apparatus of the state   and adopt a new state to tell myself I’m safe   in this body. My hands are still sticky with honey   drawn in the shape of the Battle of San Jacinto  on a biscuit in 2005. I will wash them off   in the Rio Grande and leave my footprints   among the ancient snakes and fossils   and someone might remember I was never   supposed to be here in the first place.   This time next year I will head …

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This Time Last Year 

I wandered around a hospital parking lot blasting  that one Mountain Goats song on repeat  at 3:30 in the morning. This time last year   I chain smoked along the Charles  trying to suck out the thing that didn’t necessarily  claw at my insides but scratched   every now and again just to remind me   it was there. Sometimes I wake up coughing blood  and wonder what damage has been done  overnight. Sometimes I stain my sheets  and don’t remember how all this blood  got inside me in the first place. I wandered around  that hospital parking lot because  they said that something broke inside her blood,  and I figured I had extra she could …

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All Time Phi-Low 

HBOCome and HBOGo!  By HUNTER RICHARDS    All good things must come to an end. Here I am pondering whether it was better to have HBOGo and lost, or to have never HBOGone at all. I know it’s not quite over yet but I know I’m not going to be ready September 15th when I lose you. Waiting until the first round of quizzes was truly a Phi-low blow. I never appreciated the queue of Game of Thrones episodes enough, or pretending that I cared about any other current TV shows besides Game of Thrones while scrolling through the web page after logging in.  I take back all the complaining …

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House Upon A Hill 

Winthrop opens anew as a leading example.   By HUNTER RICHARDS  Picture provided by Francesca Cornero  Following a year-long renovation as part of the River House Renewal Program, Winthrop House welcomed in its residents this August for move-in. Along with becoming more accessible for its residents, the house saw its common spaces revamped and innovative designing of its infrastructure. Students can find themselves lounging in the tunnels under the sky lighting from glass ceilings, or near the basement kitchen reminiscent of a small-city cafe, or on the polished-wood benches near the pool tables.  Photo provided by Francesca Cornero While students are …

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Arrival 

By JASPER FU    When the calm voice of the pilot clicks out over the intercom, it is always the same; whether delivered in lilting French or clipped German it is the voice of a man self-collected, professional, and bored. There is none of the anticipation that you the traveller feel at seeing the illuminated seatbelt sign flicker and dim – he will not, in all likelihood, be disembarking alongside you.   If he does, he leaves with the determined strides of Someone with Somewhere to Be in a Hurry, with Somewhere to Be currently Concourse C, Gate 37, O’Hare International Airport, a quarter mile of thronging masses …

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Successful Succession  

Goodbye, Drew! Hello ____!   By MEGAN SIMS    With the start of this school year came a big announcement: Drew Faust will step down as President of Harvard University. Faust’s reign, beginning in 2007, was marked by waves of student protest, social unrest, and massive change at the university. From Occupy Harvard to Divest protests to the imposition of sanctions of single gender social organizations, Faust’s presidency has certainly been eventful. Her imminent departure has sparked widespread speculation in regards to her successor. Who will rise to the (rather daunting) challenge of leading our beloved Harvard?    With a seat at the …

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