Your Goose Is Cooked

It’s time to publicly shame our peers. By AIDAN FITZSIMONS   This article is going to ruffle some feathers.   The Ivy League Meme page is full of memes poking gentle fun at wearers of the Canada Goose jackets which are so ubiquitous at places like Harvard when it gets cold. These memes indicate a general understanding of how ridiculous this phenomenon is, yet they also normalize it. As a community, Harvard still supports the wearers of these $1000 jackets. We talk to friends every day who wear them, and say nothing antagonistic. After all, these are our friends. We …

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Classes I Wish I Could Shop

Some musings on the things Harvard Professors can’t teach you   By ALAYA AYALA   The week after Thanksgiving is often the week when all hell starts to break loose for Harvard college students. Suddenly every essay is due, final projects are in the works, and Reading Period is just around the corner. Procrastinating is probably one of the main causes of stress during this time. Unfortunately, however, that doesn’t stop me from doing it.   During one of these fits of procrastination, I decided to start looking at classes that I could shop for next year. I found myself …

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The Concept of Counterculture

By Aidan Fitzsimmons   Philosophically, the concept of counterculture is more interesting and fundamental to human life than may originally be considered. Counterculture is defined as a subculture created in opposition to mass culture, middle class values, consumerism, mainstream media, the mores of a previous generation, the cultural hegemony of a dominant group, and other elements of “mainstream” culture. However, what is “mainstream” culture has always been contingent, and so has counterculture. Culture evolves over time in a process driven by the concept of counterculture.   Human freedom is a game of yes. Culture— in the form of language, concepts, …

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2018 Voting Memes

A Message to Young Voters   By JAYCEE YEGHER   While voting memes are hilarious and fun to share on your social media accounts, remember that you actually have to get out there and vote to elicit real change.   Memes have truly taken over the internet, and when politics are added to the mix, they get darker and even more entertaining. But memes don’t win elections. Sharing meme posts won’t get the politicians you want in office, but getting yourself out the door and voting will.   That doesn’t mean memes aren’t important in our political climate though. Political …

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The Roommate Agreement Part Two

Part Two By ALAYA AYALA   Growing up, I’d never been one to put much stock into the supernatural. I stopped believing in things like fairy tales and Santa Claus when I was about five years old. One day, I must have asked too many questions and pushed my mom a little too far. That was the day that she broke down and told me I shouldn’t believe in things that I can’t prove.   She probably thought she was saving herself time, sparing herself the trouble of having to deal with the fanciful musings of one child when she …

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What’s REALLY Horrifying at Harvard

Things go bump in the night on Ivy-League campuses, too   By ALAYA AYALA   1.The Night: A period of time during which the sun does not shine upon Harvard.   Upon being a student for little more than a year at Harvard, I have observed a truly terrifying trend at the school. It would seem that for some reason, Harvard students feel the need to guard themselves against the night. You can see this in the way they stay up until the early hours of the morning, often sitting in groups together as they fortify themselves against the darkness …

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Perchin’

Third Treetise By AIDAN FITZSIMONS   For my third tree article, I’m gonna go a bit sappier.   Now that the leaves are falling, and the trees are revealing their bare truth as fortresses of cold, reaching tendrils of bark, it is a good time to think about trees in a new light. When we were monkeys, and trees were our evolutionary domain, our earliest vocalizations would be screeched from one high branch to another. Of course, we’ve done awesome things down here on the ground since (shoutout couches), but there is still something inherently social about trees, these shared …

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The Tree Trials

Second Treetise By AIDAN FITZSIMONS   Oak-ay everyone, I’m back with my bi-weekly tree talk.   Two weeks ago, I started this column off with my favorite tree in Harvard Yard, the Emerson Evergreen Tree in Sever Quad. This week, we’re going to kick the skill level up several notches. The Emerson Tree is a relatively easy tree to climb: the first branch is accessible at standing height, and the branches continue all the way up the tree with horizontal orientations. It’s a breeze. But the two trees we’ll bark up today are another story.   If there’s one thing …

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Bi the Way, I’m Still Coming Out

Angsty Thoughts on Too Many Expectations   By: ALAYA AYALA   For me, coming to Harvard was as freeing as it was binding.   I was free from the fetters of my high school responsibilities, free from the city where I was born and raised, and even as I hated to admit it, I was free from the expectations of my old friends and family. There was a two hour barrier on I-90 separating me from my old life, and I felt light enough to officially Come Out as bisexual last fall, to everyone. I had lived with so much …

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4:22

  Class-Schedule Calculations By ALAYA AYALA   This semester, the new class schedule has caused trouble for some students, with many struggling to figure out exactly why it’s been so hard to settle into the new routine. Now that we’re a month into our semester, the Indy has sat down and done some calculations to figure out just how much more time Harvard students have been spending in class.   Last year, our classes started 7 minutes past the hour, and generally met for an hour at a time. This gave us 53 minutes total for each class. On our …

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The Roommate Agreement

By ALAYA AYALA   I woke up with a wild gasp, sitting bolt upright in my seat and frantically trying to figure out where I was. For a moment I was all panic as I realized I wasn’t in my bedroom, in fact, I was in a room surrounding by unfamiliar people, many of whom were watching me curiously. I couldn’t breathe, my heart pounding as I tried to understand what was going on. As if a lens had suddenly fallen over my vision, I realized where I was and ducked my head in shame. I’d fallen asleep in the …

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Rainbow Scales and Special Leaves

Some thoughts on childhood, stress, and college.   By ALAYA AYALA   Recently, I’ve been living for these text posts that I see on my social media feeds all the time. They’re like concentrated shots of relatable content that I can take less than five seconds to swallow. Sometimes they burn on the way down. Sometimes they leave an aftertaste. The really good ones leave me breathless for hours from laughing – or crying. Maybe it’s because I’m a lightweight when it comes to the truth.   The other day I saw a post about children’s books that really messed …

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The Best Tree in Harvard Yard

First Treetise By AIDAN FITZSIMONS     Buckle up, beeches— I’m about to treet myself.   It’s my favorite activity and about 30% of my identity. Whenever I’m feeling a bit grim about the mouth, I look around for a nice tree to climb into, and it never fails to leaf me happy. Some trees are mainly for perching, reading, and people-watching; some trees are a tantalizing challenge just to get up into; and some trees are great for climbing really, really high. I am intimately familiar with almost every climbable tree around Harvard, although I’m constantly discovering more. I’m …

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Liberal (Arts) Education

And why it needs challenging. By EMILY HALL   There was a time when the term “liberal” signified freedom.   A liberal arts education is meant to allow us to freely explore the arts and sciences, while a handful of requirements mandates that we actually do explore. This educational model has served me and many of my fellow students well—I often hear stories of favorite courses people only discovered in pursuit of a general education requirement.   But what about a liberal education? Instead of promoting freedom of inquiry, today’s inescapably liberal higher education stifles debate, kills discourse, and massacres …

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