To Autumn

The equinox upon us. By CAROLINE CRONIN The 22nd of September this year marks the Autumnal Equinox. The equinox is the time at which the astronomical season of autumn begins. An astronomical season is defined and measured by the alignment of the stars and planets, and not – as in a meteorological season – by the average temperatures of given months.  Though we have been at our green ivy-covered college for almost a whole month, the beginning of the fall season is only now upon us (and that ivy will soon grow red). To be precise, the equinox names the …

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Engi-Queering: the SWUG Chronicles

Volume 1: S.O.S. (“Suffering of Seniors”) By HUNTER RICHARDS By senior year, I’m retired from my wild days. Or, more accurately, I’m just plain tired. I’ve finally grown into the title “SWUG,” or “Senior Washed-Up Girl,” and it fits better than the first pair of leggings I bought in college that convinced me to toss all my jeans out. Personally, I believe that “SWUG” is not fully inclusive. For starters, “Senior” implies that I haven’t been entirely done with this institution (both Harvard and the practices of “going to college” and “existing”) since I stepped foot onto campus during Opening …

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Dreaming of La Reunion

By MEGAN SIMS Last night I dreamt I drove to La Reunion,  a defunct socialist utopian colony on the Trinity River, which has always to me seemed less river, more repository, more gaping concrete scar across the city of Dallas. The bridges they build to cross the ugly thing are beautiful. I dreamed of traffic. I had to cross through people, rivers, columns of a place I knew for some might seem like La Reunion’s legacy. But I feared it. I was searching for the cemetery thinking there I might find the ghosts of past somebodies or the place I …

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Shana Tova

Religion among the intelligentsia. By ALAYA AYALA Picture this: You’re sitting in class discussing a novel that you were assigned to read. The conversation is going great, everyone is making great points, and the ideas are flowing. Then someone brings up the moral implications of the novel. Suddenly, the conversation isn’t going as well. Left and right, your peers are stating their opinions, starting off with “well, I’m not religious, but…” or “Well, I am religious, and…” There’s nothing wrong with what is being said, in fact, people are still making good points. The problem is the tension in the …

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All Time Phi-Low 

HBOCome and HBOGo!  By HUNTER RICHARDS    All good things must come to an end. Here I am pondering whether it was better to have HBOGo and lost, or to have never HBOGone at all. I know it’s not quite over yet but I know I’m not going to be ready September 15th when I lose you. Waiting until the first round of quizzes was truly a Phi-low blow. I never appreciated the queue of Game of Thrones episodes enough, or pretending that I cared about any other current TV shows besides Game of Thrones while scrolling through the web page after logging in.  I take back all the complaining …

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Successful Succession  

Goodbye, Drew! Hello ____!   By MEGAN SIMS    With the start of this school year came a big announcement: Drew Faust will step down as President of Harvard University. Faust’s reign, beginning in 2007, was marked by waves of student protest, social unrest, and massive change at the university. From Occupy Harvard to Divest protests to the imposition of sanctions of single gender social organizations, Faust’s presidency has certainly been eventful. Her imminent departure has sparked widespread speculation in regards to her successor. Who will rise to the (rather daunting) challenge of leading our beloved Harvard?    With a seat at the …

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A Post-Grad Not Spent Consulting 

How to become a part of the Harvard Teaching Fellows.  By CAROLINE CRONIN    How did you decide to do HTF and at what point at the end of senior year/near graduation did you decide to do it? How is it complimentary to your undergrad career and in what ways is it totally different? What cool faculty have you been influenced by and has such influence changed your future plans? What would you want someone considering entering the program to know?   I took USW35 my Junior spring, which is when I heard about HTF and started thinking seriously about teaching as …

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Lost & Found

Things you cannot get back… By HUNTER RICHARDS By the end of your four years at Harvard, you’ll grow as a person and gain quite a lot. But you’ll lose even more. Here are some of the things you will lose around campus during your undergraduate career: Sleep You’ll hit the “snooze” button more times than you’ve swiped on Tinder, and you’re roommates hate you for it. The amount of all-nighters you’ve pulled is starting to outnumber the amount of lectures you’ve been to this spring semester. In four years, you learn how to accessorize those under-eye bags and own …

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These Walked Streets

A very broad meditation on certain tidbits of the Harvard experience. By ANDREW LIN As someone who can neither drive nor even ride a bike, walking (with some occasional help from the Mather shuttle) has by necessity become my main mode of transport around Harvard throughout my four years here. And while some might deride the slow pace walking necessarily imposes as a limiting factor in the endless hurly-burly of Things to be Done and Places to Be that Harvard can often seem like, I for one have come to rather enjoy these walks. Indeed, they’ve become so much more …

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Parting Shots

Striving for Imperfection By PEYTON FINE Scrolling through Facebook while riding the shuttle from Mather to Maxwell Dworkin, I was struck by a typical Huffington Post article. It was one of those articles about a scientific study that Huffington Post summarized, placed a title on the article, and a friend of mine had liked, so it showed up on my newsfeed. The article was titled, “If you’re a nail-biter, you’re probably a perfectionist.” “Thank God,” I thought as I was riding this shuttle. If you’ve seen my nails, you know I am a nail-biter through and through. I’ve tried to …

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This is Harvard

For all Harvard’s good and bad, it doesn’t have to be this way BY DAN VALENZUELA The first time I experienced the joy of Harvard was when I received an email congratulating me on my acceptance four years ago. Like many others, I hugged and cried with my parents. And I don’t doubt that many other high school students also had the same immense feelings of joy in the face of what seems to be a miraculous event in our lives. As I reflect back on this moment, I can only conceive of one immutable, significant fact that my own …

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Yardfest feat. VagueHandGestures

Performers we don’t have to wait for. By HUNTER RICHARDS   There’s only a little over a week left until Yardfest, but the College Events Board has yet to announce who will be performing. We haven’t felt this played since Frank Ocean strung us along until giving us hope with that livestream of him building an Ikea desk. With all the rumors of who might be coming or who might have canceled, it’s not hard to understand why Harvard students have so many trust issues. While we’re all starting to feel like Yardfest is a social experiment or that past …

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“But Where are You From From?”

 Reflections from a confused expatriate. By FRANCESCA CORNERO I have come to disconnect my brain from my words every time I answer the question of where I am from. No matter whether I tell you I am Italian, which means I want this conversation to end as quickly as possible, or whether I tell you I am Mexican, which means I am feeling patient, or whether I explain the story of my life; at this point I feel nothing but exhaustion for the epic I need to tell in order to account for all the pieces. When I get asked …

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The Inadequacy of Honesty

A world without hypocrites and frauds isn’t a world at all. BY DAN VALENZUELA For some reason whenever I set out to write this column, I feel as though I have a moral duty to present an authentic self with honest arguments that come from my heart and mind. This admission, however, seems to do little to convince you that I am in fact honest in my arguments, given all you have to go on is my word. So I’ll offer this: I am desperately trying to be honest about my honesty. Yet this second admission, like the first admission, …

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