Lost & Found

Things you cannot get back… By HUNTER RICHARDS By the end of your four years at Harvard, you’ll grow as a person and gain quite a lot. But you’ll lose even more. Here are some of the things you will lose around campus during your undergraduate career: Sleep You’ll hit the “snooze” button more times than you’ve swiped on Tinder, and you’re roommates hate you for it. The amount of all-nighters you’ve pulled is starting to outnumber the amount of lectures you’ve been to this spring semester. In four years, you learn how to accessorize those under-eye bags and own …




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These Walked Streets

A very broad meditation on certain tidbits of the Harvard experience. By ANDREW LIN As someone who can neither drive nor even ride a bike, walking (with some occasional help from the Mather shuttle) has by necessity become my main mode of transport around Harvard throughout my four years here. And while some might deride the slow pace walking necessarily imposes as a limiting factor in the endless hurly-burly of Things to be Done and Places to Be that Harvard can often seem like, I for one have come to rather enjoy these walks. Indeed, they’ve become so much more …




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Parting Shots

Striving for Imperfection By PEYTON FINE Scrolling through Facebook while riding the shuttle from Mather to Maxwell Dworkin, I was struck by a typical Huffington Post article. It was one of those articles about a scientific study that Huffington Post summarized, placed a title on the article, and a friend of mine had liked, so it showed up on my newsfeed. The article was titled, “If you’re a nail-biter, you’re probably a perfectionist.” “Thank God,” I thought as I was riding this shuttle. If you’ve seen my nails, you know I am a nail-biter through and through. I’ve tried to …




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This is Harvard

For all Harvard’s good and bad, it doesn’t have to be this way BY DAN VALENZUELA The first time I experienced the joy of Harvard was when I received an email congratulating me on my acceptance four years ago. Like many others, I hugged and cried with my parents. And I don’t doubt that many other high school students also had the same immense feelings of joy in the face of what seems to be a miraculous event in our lives. As I reflect back on this moment, I can only conceive of one immutable, significant fact that my own …




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Yardfest feat. VagueHandGestures

Performers we don’t have to wait for. By HUNTER RICHARDS   There’s only a little over a week left until Yardfest, but the College Events Board has yet to announce who will be performing. We haven’t felt this played since Frank Ocean strung us along until giving us hope with that livestream of him building an Ikea desk. With all the rumors of who might be coming or who might have canceled, it’s not hard to understand why Harvard students have so many trust issues. While we’re all starting to feel like Yardfest is a social experiment or that past …




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“But Where are You From From?”

 Reflections from a confused expatriate. By FRANCESCA CORNERO I have come to disconnect my brain from my words every time I answer the question of where I am from. No matter whether I tell you I am Italian, which means I want this conversation to end as quickly as possible, or whether I tell you I am Mexican, which means I am feeling patient, or whether I explain the story of my life; at this point I feel nothing but exhaustion for the epic I need to tell in order to account for all the pieces. When I get asked …




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The Inadequacy of Honesty

A world without hypocrites and frauds isn’t a world at all. BY DAN VALENZUELA For some reason whenever I set out to write this column, I feel as though I have a moral duty to present an authentic self with honest arguments that come from my heart and mind. This admission, however, seems to do little to convince you that I am in fact honest in my arguments, given all you have to go on is my word. So I’ll offer this: I am desperately trying to be honest about my honesty. Yet this second admission, like the first admission, …




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Expectations on My Dream School

A Reflection. By HUNTER RICHARDS   When my mom came to visit me for Junior Parents Weekend, she wanted to see the buildings I spend most of my time in for classes. “That’s Pierce: I have my physics class there on Tuesdays and Thursdays. That’s Maxwell Dworkin: I took Fluids there last year. That’s the Science Center: I took biochemistry in there freshman year.” Unfortunately, it’s harder to lie to my mom in person than it is when she’s 800 miles away.   My mom wasn’t on campus for more than 6 hours before I pointed out where I was …




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The High Functioning Trap

More than what you produce. By ANONYMOUS   Standing in an empty kitchen in an apartment in Brookline, my boyfriend and his new roommate talk about their experiences with hospitalization. They swap programs, talk about partial hospitalizations and residential stays. I stay silent. Somehow, despite being actively suicidal several times a week throughout high school and self-harming on and off for six years, I managed to avoid ever being hospitalized. Always stopping on the edge something that would be majorly self-destructive, something that would get noticed.   My therapist finally mentioned recently that I probably have Borderline Personality Disorder, confirming …




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On the Rails

Why the country isn’t going off track. BY DAN VALENZUELA For spring break this year I visited the only college in America that could figuratively say it’s older than Harvard: the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. Fifty-seven years after Harvard’s founding, William & Mary was officially chartered in 1693. In 1618, however, the original plan for the college that would eventually become William & Mary was made by the Virginia Company of London, before the Pilgrims made land at Plymouth. In this way, William & Mary could be said to be older than Harvard. However, a devastating …




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Housing Daze

A sorting quiz. Harvard students are control freaks, so imagine how hard they must be vibrating knowing they have no say in what residential community they get placed into? You may not have any power over whether you can hope for a single your sophomore year or whether you need to reallocate your budget from Domino’s to mouse traps, but neither do we! In spirit of saying things that have absolutely no meaning, much like when the administration starts making committees instead of moving forward with any actions, the Independent has come up with a Housing Day quiz to help …




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Senior Spring

A Bucket List. By CAROLINE GENTILE As I walked up the steps of Agassiz Theater on my way to performing in Ghungroo, I couldn’t help but think back to the first time I had been to the Ag: March of my junior year of high school. Five years ago. On my Harvard College admissions tour. I almost stopped out of disbelief that here I was, in the same place, five years later—but on the other end of everything. When I had first traipsed these steps, my mind was dancing with all of the possibilities of what could be if I …




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Reorienting Liberalism

The changing goals of advocacy. The liberal cause has advocated a variety of policies in the past century. These have been consistent neither across regions, nor through time. But hardly ever before has it seemed so pressing a challenge to reorient liberal advocacy for the greater good than it does across much of the West today. A series of challenges paved the way for a breakdown in global governance through 2016: turmoil in the Middle East continually pushing refugees out of the region and into Europe; UK’s vote to leave the European Union amidst chaotic domestic polarization; and, perhaps most …




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