My fault, my fault, my most grievous fault

A poem By REMEDY RYAN You can touch the cross around your neck all you want When has that ever saved anybody? Some days I kneel   and all I can feel is the strain in my spine and the carpet burn on my knees as I look up at the eucharist this is the body that was given up for you and wonder if I’ve ever believed anything all the way wonder when I started to think it was okay to wear shorts to church but hoc est corpus meum and if Jesus knows anything about this body then …

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Work of the Week

Worlds Teresa Rokos (2015) Acrylic and sharpie on canvas These three paintings are a series I did in my senior year of high school for my AP studio art portfolio. The idea was to represent the same thing in two different ways simultaneously, as it is seen or used or presented in different worlds. I hoped the contrast would highlight either the beauty or ugliness of the various forms, and I often used a modified self-portrait to represent the “first world” I knew so well. The first painting depicts facial markings. While visually similar, one set of markings is part …

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Brain Peace

A Poem By ABIGAIL KOERNER   Brain peace when I got what I wanted And had what had to be had and Done and did. Brain peace because Each step should be a leap and Each hill a mountain when I’m climbing up! “Take me away,” I’d ask But there is nothing to take In the deep, dark hole of a woman Where I sat and hugged my knees to my chest. Trapped in a bubble that I blew myself after Chewing and smacking that same piece of gum for hours… Until it finally popped. Then, I was just sitting. …

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A Mother’s Burning Fury in “Three Billboards”

A late take on “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” in a pre-Oscars review series. By: CLAIRE PARK   In Martin McDonagh’s “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Frances McDormand perfects the exquisitely subtle acrobatics of rage as Mildred Hayes, from the way she crunches on her nails as she surveys the billboards that will announce her crusade against the ineffectual police department, to the moment she wrests a fire extinguisher out of her son’s hands and lets loose the rawest, most gravelly scream I’ve ever heard. With the help of the quietly bold Red Welby, Ebbing’s advertising salesman, Mildred erects three …

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“The Shape of Water” and the Reality-Warping Magic of Love

A late take on Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” in a pre-Oscars review series. By CLAIRE PARK In “The Shape of Water,” we are plunged into the green netherworld of early 1960’s Baltimore. Elisa Esposito (Sally Hawkins) is a cleaning woman at a government research facility. She falls in love with the newly imported “Asset,” a hulking blue-green amphibious creature (Doug Jones) plucked from South American waters, whose superhuman physicality might aid the United States in the space race against the Soviets and who the grittily vicious project supervisor Richard Strickland (Michael Shannon) tortures senselessly with a cattle …

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Tumbling into Adulthood with “Lady Bird”

A late review of Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird,” in a pre-Oscars review series. By: CLAIRE PARK   Greta Gerwig’s directorial debut, “Lady Bird,” is an affectionate meditation on the ecstatic missteps of adolescence. Her script is peppered with witticisms that teenagers will throw out, often inappropriately; taken out of context, Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson’s (played by the radiant shape-shifter Saoirse Ronan) indignant ripostes could be framed—“Just because something looks ugly doesn’t mean it’s morally wrong,” and “Different things can be sad. It’s not all war”—but mostly embroil her in fiery arguments with her critical, fastidious mother (Laurie Metcalf), and earn …

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19

“You thought you were done with this didn’t you?” You think as you pull yourself off the icy road and hobble into your dorm On the eve of your 19th birthday Pull out the hydrogen peroxide and watch it sizzle on your knee Somehow closer to nine than nineteen   The child in you has always sat close to the surface Blood, ready to ooze out of a fresh wound You’ll remember this later   When you grin At the off-key rendition of the birthday song Even a year into adulthood You still need them to sing Still need the …

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Behind the Lens: Lucy Devine

Work of the Week By ABIGAIL KOERNER   Lucy Devine is not your average History and Literature concentrator. After class, she can be found on the streets of Cambridge and beyond, photographing anything and everything. In viewing her work, it is critical to note that Lucy only ever takes the same photo once. She chooses to use film over a digital camera because of the intrigue that each unique photo she takes creates. “I can’t see the photos I take when I’m taking them, and I get the film developed a week to a month later. I’m always surprised to …

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