“The Shape of Water” and the Reality-Warping Magic of Love

A late take on Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” in a pre-Oscars review series. By CLAIRE PARK In “The Shape of Water,” we are plunged into the green netherworld of early 1960’s Baltimore. Elisa Esposito (Sally Hawkins) is a cleaning woman at a government research facility. She falls in love with the newly imported “Asset,” a hulking blue-green amphibious creature (Doug Jones) plucked from South American waters, whose superhuman physicality might aid the United States in the space race against the Soviets and who the grittily vicious project supervisor Richard Strickland (Michael Shannon) tortures senselessly with a cattle …

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Tumbling into Adulthood with “Lady Bird”

A late review of Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird,” in a pre-Oscars review series. By: CLAIRE PARK   Greta Gerwig’s directorial debut, “Lady Bird,” is an affectionate meditation on the ecstatic missteps of adolescence. Her script is peppered with witticisms that teenagers will throw out, often inappropriately; taken out of context, Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson’s (played by the radiant shape-shifter Saoirse Ronan) indignant ripostes could be framed—“Just because something looks ugly doesn’t mean it’s morally wrong,” and “Different things can be sad. It’s not all war”—but mostly embroil her in fiery arguments with her critical, fastidious mother (Laurie Metcalf), and earn …

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19

“You thought you were done with this didn’t you?” You think as you pull yourself off the icy road and hobble into your dorm On the eve of your 19th birthday Pull out the hydrogen peroxide and watch it sizzle on your knee Somehow closer to nine than nineteen   The child in you has always sat close to the surface Blood, ready to ooze out of a fresh wound You’ll remember this later   When you grin At the off-key rendition of the birthday song Even a year into adulthood You still need them to sing Still need the …

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Behind the Lens: Lucy Devine

Work of the Week By ABIGAIL KOERNER   Lucy Devine is not your average History and Literature concentrator. After class, she can be found on the streets of Cambridge and beyond, photographing anything and everything. In viewing her work, it is critical to note that Lucy only ever takes the same photo once. She chooses to use film over a digital camera because of the intrigue that each unique photo she takes creates. “I can’t see the photos I take when I’m taking them, and I get the film developed a week to a month later. I’m always surprised to …

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Unpeeling Pain in Call Me by Your Name

A late take on the movie in a pre-Oscars review series. By CLAIRE PARK   In Luca Guadagnino’s Oscar-nominated picture Call Me by Your Name, based on the 2007 novel by André Aciman and adapted for the screen by James Ivory, the summer of 1983 unravels in languidly peeled layers, as bibliophile and musical prodigy teenager Elio Perlman (Timothée Chalamet) spends time with his family on their rustic estate in a mystical “Somewhere in Northern Italy.” Guadagnino gives the scenes a both gritty and surreal quality; the landscapes boast lurid colors – Oliver’s green swimming shorts, the grimy and yellow …

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The Calzone

By ABIGAIL JADE KOERNER Standing in line was annoying. It seemed like people had too much to say and too much change to count! At three o’clock on a Monday, people should be at work. People should be invested in themselves and their lives. Angry thoughts rippled down to my tapping foot which tapped on the floor of the place. Tile floor. Black and white tiles that would make your head spin if you looked down at them for too long or at an odd angle. The line inched forward. On the way to the register, we moved past sausages, …

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Coco and its Willfully Wondrous Foray into Death

A review of Pixar’s “Coco.” By CLAIRE PARK   Coco is about Miguel, a twelve year old boy whose unflagging ambition to become a musician leads him to steal the guitar from his idol Ernesto de la Cruz’s mausoleum, a transgression that transports him to the Land of the Dead. He reunites with long-lost family members, who refuse him their blessing to become a musician, aligning with a long-standing familial animus toward music after Miguel’s great-great grandfather abandoned the family to perform for the world. In order to return to the living world, Miguel needs the blessing of a family …

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