The Indy Blog is Here!

Introducing Our 2015 Summer Blog The Indy is proud to present its 2015 Summer Bloggers. As usual, the Indy is here to provide you with witty insights, in-depth social commentary, and unique perspectives. Our summer bloggers are all over the world doing amazing things from traveling through Asia, to working at big-name tech companies. Check our blog every week to read about their adventures!   Willy Xiao Willy Xiao ’16 ([email protected]) is an engineer with an attitude. As a summer tech intern, he commits most days to staring at a computer screen of function-definitions and hash-tables. Most of his writing comes as snake_case_variable_names, and most …






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‘Do My Boobs Look Weird?’

A stream-of-conscious account of having sex.  What’s more deafening and mood killing than my roommate occasionally blasting the Game of Thrones soundtrack or “Ode to Joy” when I bring someone over? My own mind! It distracts me from fully enjoying the sex I’m currently having! Watching sex scenes in movies and television shows gave me a very unrealistic expectation of what sex would and could be like in college. Surprisingly, there was no fade to black montage of backs gracefully thrusting with Mazzy Star’s “Fade Into You” playing in the background. While I definitely wouldn’t call myself a sexual wizard, …






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Losing It

A lot less glamorous than Gossip Girl. I remember playing truth or dare in seventh grade at a quintessential middle school sleepover. Most of the dares involved calling boys we admitted to having crushes on during truth’s using *67, except for the one dare which forced me to eat cat food because I would rather do that than say the name of the first boy I had kissed (my friend admitted to me that he was gay quickly after the kiss). With the aftertaste of cat food in my mouth, I asked my friend Erin a loaded question for her …






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Get Wet

The Science of Squirting. Girls are generally thought to be confusing creatures.  But nothing seems more confounding than the female anatomy, especially with regards to sex. Unlike males, not all females can come during intercourse—why is that? Is the G-spot even a real thing? Can females, like males, ejaculate? Is female ejaculation the same as “squirting”? My most recent ex-boyfriend asked me if I could “squirt.”  “It would be so awesome if you did,” he said. “Um, not that I know of,” I replied, “but maybe that just means you need to try harder?” His question got me thinking—are all …






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Not Even Regina George Would

A Response to calling people out over email. Early this past Sunday morning at 2:26 AM, March 1st, the email that has had all of Harvard talking for the last few days was received over an underground mailing list. The message was short and simple. Subject Line: “Dear Ten man” Body: “Thought that was a party suite? EOM”  Yes, that was the entirety of the original email. Shots were fired. Shade was cast. For those unfamiliar with the story, a student decided to publicly complain about the lack of parties hosted by a particular Harvard suite. There is an unspoken …






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Mental Health Services; A True Service?

Personal experiences with Harvard’s Mental Health Services. I remember the first time I used Harvard’s Mental Health Services. The fall had been a struggle, largely due to the punch process. Two of my best friends had used HUHS since freshmen year, and they suggested that I reach out. I was nervous, but figured it was worth a shot. I had never participated in any sort of therapy and was honestly terrified. Was a doctor going to simply give me drugs? Was I better off dealing with this on my own? How could I trust a stranger over my friends or …






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Nowhere To Go

Boston’s Long Island Shelter abruptly closes. By A CONCERNED GROUP OF HARVARD STUDENTS Imagine you are coming back to your house after a long day of class only to be told that Harvard officials deemed your residence unsafe. You are unable to go to your room and gather any of your belongings or important documents. Harvard has made no concrete plans to relocate you and the other 450 displaced residences from your house. While the eleven other houses have a few open beds, navigating the system to gain access to them proves incredibly difficult, especially because you do not have …






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Remembering a Childhood Legend

The Life of Jovian, Lemur Star of Zobomafoo. Jovian the lemur passed away on November 11, 2014 at the Duke Lemur Center. The Coquerel’s sifaka lemur host of Zobomafoo was 20 years old. Born in 1994 at the Duke Lemur Center, Jovian was always athletic, constantly bounding about his enclosure. This athleticism is what gave him his big break. Since Zobomafoo was a kid’s show, its star had to be as high-energy and enthusiastic as its viewers. Jovian, and his parents, Nigel and Flavia, were ideal candidates. All three of them were featured in the show, but Jovian was the …






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An Atypical Night at the Museum

The excitement and splendor of the Harvard Art Museums Student Opening By HERDA XHAFERAJ Thursday, November 6th, was an atypical night for the many curious Harvard students who patiently waited in line for tickets to the Harvard Art Museum student opening. The newly renovated building assembled three pre-existing museums, namely the Fogg Museum, the Busch-Reisinger Museum, and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum. According to the Museums’ website, the collection as a whole includes a staggering 250,000 objects from every era since ancient times and objects from the Americas, Europe, North Africa, the Mediterranean, and Asia. It also includes objects of …






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Shedding a New Light on Rothko

BY CHRISTINA BIANCO The impressive union of art and technology in the new Harvard Art Museums’ inaugural exhibition. In many ways Harvard is the perfect place for innovations in interdisciplinary fields to occur. It is no wonder that such a place, with its dedication to teaching and learning, could bring together a team of curators, artists, and scientists in order to revive an old, faded, and forgotten painting. The new Mark Rothko exhibition at the Harvard Art Museum attempts to revitalize six Mark Rothko murals that have sadly received little time in the spotlight. The new exhibition uses projections in …






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The Not-So-Subtle Anti-Semitism of Today

Why Israel’s existence should be a concern for all Jews. “It is language, after all, that’s at the heart of the ubiquitous slippage from anger at Israeli military action to hatred of Jews.” – Deborah Lipstadt, New York Times At the beginning of March 2013, the Harvard Palestine Solidarity Committee made the decision to distribute notices to college students on campus that read, “We regret to inform you that your suite is scheduled for demolition in the next three days.” Although the PSC denied sending this eviction notice to only people with “Jewish-sounding” last names, some suites received the notice …






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Love in Leviticus

A message to those opposing marriage equality. As an atheist, I couldn’t care less if you practice a religion and are very devoted to your faith. It is your undeniable right to practice any faith you wish. Even though you might think it’s weird if I came up to you and said, “I still love you despite the fact that you’re religious,” I am totally used to and not really offended — though not particularly thrilled either — when you tell me that you love me despite me being gay. Thanks, bud. The thing is I don’t really care too …






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An Open Letter to Harvard

Unapologetic and refusing to remain silent. This weekend, current Harvard College students and recent alumni received racially charged e-mail death threats from an unknown sender who has continued to contact individuals over the past few days. While recipients of the threats ranged in identity and background, a disproportionate number of these e-mails targeted Asian and Asian American women across years, student groups, and ethnic backgrounds. Signed off with “I promise you, slit-eyes,” the email invokes racist language clearly and outrageously targeted towards Asian Americans. As an Asian-American community, we are deeply affected by this act of hate that unnerved many …






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Struggling with Privilege: Part 2

A Chat with Nick Barber Recently, a friend of mine, Nick Barber, wrote an opinion piece for the Harvard Crimson titled “Struggling with Privilege.” Within the article, he discusses his observation that Harvard students of similar socioeconomic groups, especially the most elite, tend to stick together. The article had a strong following on Facebook; his post has over 200 likes, 21 shares, 22 comments, and has additionally been posted by many of his friends. It seems as though recently, the most popular or controversial articles from the Crimson bombard my newsfeed, and Nick’s piece was no exception. Most people agree …






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