Always 

Some awkward coming out moments.  By ALAYA AYALA    The first time I came out of the closet, I tripped and landed on my face.   That moment has crystallized in my mind. I see it through cracked rose-colored glasses. Bittersweet and fragile, and hilarious for all the wrong reasons.  I came out for the first time to my friends. We were in tenth grade, and we were playing truth or dare during lunch because we were too cool and too lame to eat in the cafeteria downstairs. I’m assuming that whoever is reading this can already see how having a group …

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Oktoberfest 

The Why’s, When’s, and Where’s.   BY ALAYA AYALA    Last weekend marked the close of Munich’s annual Oktoberfest celebration, with the closing events taking place on October 3rd. That doesn’t mean the fun is over however, as Massachusetts has its own Oktoberfest celebrations coming later in October.   So what is Oktoberfest, exactly?  Known as the largest beer festival in the world, Oktoberfest has its origins in the German city of Munich. In 1810, Crown Prince Ludwig married his bride, Therese on October 12 and invited the citizens of Munich to celebrate the happy day. At the time, there was more food than alcohol at the fair, and it was focused more …

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We Want to Give Back Too

Public service summer funding and the difficulties that come with being low-income. By ALAYA AYALA To have a summer job or to volunteer? That is the question – whether ‘tis nobler to work to pay your bills, or to work in public service without an income, is the never-ending battle that low income students must wage within themselves when spring term rolls around. For many of us, the answer is unavoidably the former. We need to work over the summer, we often don’t have a choice. Something that Harvard is rather good at is helping its students find lucrative summer …

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Shana Tova

Religion among the intelligentsia. By ALAYA AYALA Picture this: You’re sitting in class discussing a novel that you were assigned to read. The conversation is going great, everyone is making great points, and the ideas are flowing. Then someone brings up the moral implications of the novel. Suddenly, the conversation isn’t going as well. Left and right, your peers are stating their opinions, starting off with “well, I’m not religious, but…” or “Well, I am religious, and…” There’s nothing wrong with what is being said, in fact, people are still making good points. The problem is the tension in the …

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