On Polyamory

On Polyamory A word— or, a few words— about polyamory. By AIDAN FITZSIMONS   I think I realized I was polyamorous near the end of last term. It had been a wild term, and I had been having a lot of sex, with a lot of different people. I had been absolutely addicted to Tinder, and I increasingly loved both the thrill of becoming intimate with someone new and the pleasure that comes with cultivating and deepening an existing relationship. For a while, I simply thought of myself as a bit of a slut, something to feel guilty about; I …

Continue reading On Polyamory

Pruned

Pruned A Poem By AIDAN FITZSIMMONS   Figurine trees pose in the college yard, unclimbable, unfurling branches just above human reach, ungraspable. Today I studied one, circling softly, squirrel mind loud, searching for those subtle stairs only simians sense. They should be there; instead, there’s only stark featureless bark and dead gnarled nubs, wood belly buttons where life would tree, neutered for fear; would we become aware of our freedom, foolishly climbing by tree will, fleeing the godlike shears? But even those amputated limbs stay as stumps unscaled, for the true pruning leaves no trace but a bare, “perfect” trunk, …

Continue reading Pruned

Andrew Gillum

Andrew Gillum Tallahassee Mayor and Florida Gubernatorial Candidate Andrew Gillum visited Harvard. By AIDAN FITZSIMMONS   On Monday night, former Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum visited Harvard and gave a “Fireside Chat” in the Winthrop House Junior Common Room. Gillum, a progressive Democrat, became a national sensation in 2018 when he ran a hotly-contested race for Governor of Florida. The election was closely watched by many during the 2018 election season as an indicator of a possible “Blue Wave.” He narrowly lost the election to Republican Ron DeSantis, although he withdrew his initial concession when a recount was initiated. He ultimately …

Continue reading Andrew Gillum

For Lecture Girl

For Lecture Girl A Poem By AIDAN FITZSIMMONS   Red bow unslightly askew I wish I could ask you why Seventy-five degrees tilted From norm, it grasps few Loose limp unwashed hairs But most fall unaware   No time in the morning For anything but running This girl four rows down Had to run or Had to sleep or Had to stay awake– Same thing   I can relate, girl, bow; I woke late Dashed class in yesterday’s clothes (Who is ever truly sheveled, you know?) So to the back of your unsightly bow With botchelized breath I breathe oaths …

Continue reading For Lecture Girl

Standish Library

Standish Library A Poem By AIDAN FITZSIMONS   There is a tall clock on the front wall Facing all of Standish Library Does not tick or seem to move at all It does when you don’t look But the time is often off   A giant sun shape Brass, gold, dull, heavy, painted, fake The clock is as long as me But it never expands or shines or changes or burns Which is how you know it is not me And not the sun, see   Even though I know it’s fake It feels imperial, definitive Its rays radiate evenly …

Continue reading Standish Library

As Spun in the Eliot House Record Room

As Spun in the Eliot House Record Room Tucked away in the shelves of the Record Room resides a cultural artifact By AIDAN FITZSIMMONS and MARISSA GARCIA Nestled within Eliot House is a Record Room, vaguely scented of old album covers. Upon its hardwood floors– blanketed with an ornate red carpet– sit two threadbare sofas, angled to face the centerpiece of the room: a record player. Behind it, two bookshelves span the entirety of the wall. In an endearing contrast to the grandeur of the darkened-wood aesthetic, the bookshelves are lined with jagged cut-outs of white paper labels, imperfected throughout …

Continue reading As Spun in the Eliot House Record Room

Moral Capitalism

Moral Capitalism Congressman Kennedy lays out his economic vision at the Harvard Law School By AIDAN FITZSIMONS   Last Monday, Congressman Joe Kennedy III (D-MA), who graduated with a law degree from Harvard Law School in 2009 and now represents Massachusetts’ Fourth District, which stretches from Newton and Brookline south to Attleboro and Fall River, spoke on his vision of a “moral capitalism” to a packed audience at the John T. Dunlop forum held in Wasserstein Hall. The John T. Dunlop forum is run by the Harvard Law School Labor and Worklife Program, which aims to foster research, problem solving, …

Continue reading Moral Capitalism

Your Goose Is Cooked

It’s time to publicly shame our peers. By AIDAN FITZSIMONS   This article is going to ruffle some feathers.   The Ivy League Meme page is full of memes poking gentle fun at wearers of the Canada Goose jackets which are so ubiquitous at places like Harvard when it gets cold. These memes indicate a general understanding of how ridiculous this phenomenon is, yet they also normalize it. As a community, Harvard still supports the wearers of these $1000 jackets. We talk to friends every day who wear them, and say nothing antagonistic. After all, these are our friends. We …

Continue reading Your Goose Is Cooked

The Concept of Counterculture

By Aidan Fitzsimmons   Philosophically, the concept of counterculture is more interesting and fundamental to human life than may originally be considered. Counterculture is defined as a subculture created in opposition to mass culture, middle class values, consumerism, mainstream media, the mores of a previous generation, the cultural hegemony of a dominant group, and other elements of “mainstream” culture. However, what is “mainstream” culture has always been contingent, and so has counterculture. Culture evolves over time in a process driven by the concept of counterculture.   Human freedom is a game of yes. Culture— in the form of language, concepts, …

Continue reading The Concept of Counterculture

Perchin’

Third Treetise By AIDAN FITZSIMONS   For my third tree article, I’m gonna go a bit sappier.   Now that the leaves are falling, and the trees are revealing their bare truth as fortresses of cold, reaching tendrils of bark, it is a good time to think about trees in a new light. When we were monkeys, and trees were our evolutionary domain, our earliest vocalizations would be screeched from one high branch to another. Of course, we’ve done awesome things down here on the ground since (shoutout couches), but there is still something inherently social about trees, these shared …

Continue reading Perchin’

The Tree Trials

Second Treetise By AIDAN FITZSIMONS   Oak-ay everyone, I’m back with my bi-weekly tree talk.   Two weeks ago, I started this column off with my favorite tree in Harvard Yard, the Emerson Evergreen Tree in Sever Quad. This week, we’re going to kick the skill level up several notches. The Emerson Tree is a relatively easy tree to climb: the first branch is accessible at standing height, and the branches continue all the way up the tree with horizontal orientations. It’s a breeze. But the two trees we’ll bark up today are another story.   If there’s one thing …

Continue reading The Tree Trials

The Best Tree in Harvard Yard

First Treetise By AIDAN FITZSIMONS     Buckle up, beeches— I’m about to treet myself.   It’s my favorite activity and about 30% of my identity. Whenever I’m feeling a bit grim about the mouth, I look around for a nice tree to climb into, and it never fails to leaf me happy. Some trees are mainly for perching, reading, and people-watching; some trees are a tantalizing challenge just to get up into; and some trees are great for climbing really, really high. I am intimately familiar with almost every climbable tree around Harvard, although I’m constantly discovering more. I’m …

Continue reading The Best Tree in Harvard Yard