The Final Review?

Khurana, the USGSO, and student-athletes. By HAILEY NOVIS and CAROLINE CRONIN The week before Spring Break, the College and all its constituents operate on a last-leg mentality amidst a flurry of midterms, theses, meets and matches, and the panic-induced hysteria of finalizing summer internships and next term plans. Students of all years do their best to have fun with Housing Day and spring break trips while succeeding in all that is expected of them. It is in the middle of this chaotic rush that Dean Rakesh Khurana, of Cabot House, has dropped the “USGSO Implementation Committee Final Report” through a …






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Housing Daze

A sorting quiz. Harvard students are control freaks, so imagine how hard they must be vibrating knowing they have no say in what residential community they get placed into? You may not have any power over whether you can hope for a single your sophomore year or whether you need to reallocate your budget from Domino’s to mouse traps, but neither do we! In spirit of saying things that have absolutely no meaning, much like when the administration starts making committees instead of moving forward with any actions, the Independent has come up with a Housing Day quiz to help …






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Senior Spring

A Bucket List. By CAROLINE GENTILE As I walked up the steps of Agassiz Theater on my way to performing in Ghungroo, I couldn’t help but think back to the first time I had been to the Ag: March of my junior year of high school. Five years ago. On my Harvard College admissions tour. I almost stopped out of disbelief that here I was, in the same place, five years later—but on the other end of everything. When I had first traipsed these steps, my mind was dancing with all of the possibilities of what could be if I …






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Smoke on the Water

Swimmers, divers, and champions.   Scrolling through the Men’s Varsity Swim and Dive team’s results this season provides variety in many ways, from meets held all over the country – from Salt Lake City, Utah to Austin Texas – to tight scores and dominant blowouts. The common thread, however, is constant W. The Crimson entered this weekend undefeated thus far, with huge, consecutive victories over Penn (206-88) and Brown (226-74) in the same weekend; their closest match was a 59-point victory over Utah, outside of the Ivy League Conference. Thus, expectations were optimistic and high for the Ivy League Championships …






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Reorienting Liberalism

The changing goals of advocacy. The liberal cause has advocated a variety of policies in the past century. These have been consistent neither across regions, nor through time. But hardly ever before has it seemed so pressing a challenge to reorient liberal advocacy for the greater good than it does across much of the West today. A series of challenges paved the way for a breakdown in global governance through 2016: turmoil in the Middle East continually pushing refugees out of the region and into Europe; UK’s vote to leave the European Union amidst chaotic domestic polarization; and, perhaps most …






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This is How Satire Ends

Not with a bang but with straw men. Surely the staff of Satire V are good, decent people that work hard to bring laughter into our lives. “In Defense of the Immigration Ban (First Post)”—the top piece on their website as of this writing—makes me think differently, however. It makes me think that the hollow straw men T.S. Eliot describes in “The Hollow Men” take over Satire V every once in a while to write vitriol instead of incisive satire. This piece appeared a day after an op-ed arguing for the legitimacy of President Trump’s immigration ban was published in …






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To Preserve, Protect, and Defend

Thoughts on the office of the President.   This Presidents’ Day, I’ve thought a lot about the institution of the presidency itself. The attitudes that people have adopted toward our current POTUS have ranged from vitriolic to idolatrous, for a variety of reasons. However, the presidency transcends the individual who holds the post at any given time. It has persisted even when individual presidents have been assassinated; it has persisted through resignations. The office has persisted, and the Constitution has persisted. Our country holds the record for the longest running peaceful transition of power in modern history, and our presidential …






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Streaks and Losses

Harvard Squash at National Championship.   Before attending Harvard, I knew very little about the sport of squash. I’d heard the name, knew that some people, somewhere played it, but had never really spent much thought on it; that was before I met Saad. We connected over a common dorm, Holworthy, and right in the middle of sharing more about his background from Egypt, he casually mentioned squash. Little did I know that Saadeldin Aish was one of the top squash players in the entire world and was soon to be Harvard’s #1 court player.  And thus, in my first …






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Overnight

Small deeds during the small hours at Y2Y.   It is almost 10 PM when I ring the wrong doorbell at Zero Church Street. This winter night is a mild one, not below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, but First Parish is silent; this is not where I am meant to be. I realize my mistake and shuffle sheepishly down the block until I reach One Church. I can see damp footprints made by shoes tracking in fresh snowmelt. Through the window is the stairwell. Through the quiet murmur of the street, I hear voices and shuffling below. Two floors down, work …






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