Capturing the Pulse of Harvard-Yale

Freshman perspectives. Harvard-Yale weekend: The scores of the last 9 years, the confidence that rocks Harvard, and the passion with which we support our team; within just months of being here, freshman have been swept up in the whirlwind that has led up to the weekend that is November 18th. But for a significant portion of current Harvard freshman, they could just as easily have been the ones on the bus or train, coming here for the first time. The cross-admits: Ranging from those who only applied to two schools, to those seeking admissions success across all the Ivies, and …






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Question 4

Legalize marijuana? On November 8, the people of Massachusetts answered a very crucial question by the ballot. It was not a question that occupied nearly as much airtime as the election; nevertheless, it concerns almost every one of us who reside in this state for the foreseeable future. This question, listed as ‘4’ on the ballot, if answered ‘yes’ would “…permit the possession, use, distribution, and cultivation of marijuana in limited amounts by persons age 21 and older and would remove criminal penalties for such activities.” This newspaper has always considered it its prerogative to give a voice to views …






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Elections That Matter: The UC

Voting that does not require an absentee ballot. The democratic process has taken hit after hit this election cycle. Many of us have dreaded the arrival of our absentee ballots and put off sending them back due to our disillusionment with American politics and general fear for the future. (Hint: you all should have done that by now, though.) At a time when it is ever so important to make our voices heard, many are reluctant to speak up. But while those Official Election Mail envelopes have been sitting ignored in our mailboxes and desks, members of the Harvard community …






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Strike 1

The unfortunate saga of Harvard and its Dining Services. It may appear that the strike by Harvard’s dining services employees has subdued in the last week. Appearances can indeed be misleading. As the university has tried to ensure that meals in the dining halls grow in quality as the strike wears on—understandably so, given the the initial displacement in the supply-chain—it has given some students the false impression that the impact of the strike on their lives has gotten progressively minimal. In fact, the last couple of days have seen the most substantial developments in negotiations between the leaders of …






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Why Harvard Won’t Feed Me: A History of Muslim Students vs. HUDS

Thought you had it bad with the HUDS strike? Think again. As Harvard students confront the lack of food options on campus, they may be confronting first hand what it meant to be a Muslim on campus before 2015. In light of the HUDS strike, students across the campus have raised concerns about about the hygiene, nutritional content and variety of the new dining hall offerings. Yet, Muslim undergraduates before 2015 had to live with such restrictions in Harvard dining halls every single day and meal. Muslims are forbidden from eating non-halal meat. Halal simply means permitted or lawful, and …






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Without Yield

As week two of HUDS strike comes to a close, no deal in sight. As of yesterday, Harvard University Dining Services workers will have been striking for one week. In that time, several more negotiation sessions between Local 26 (the union representing HUDS) and Harvard have been held, but no deal has been reached. You can find HUDS workers picketing every day in the Science Center plaza. They march with Support the Strike and Unite Here Local 26 signs. Echoes of “What do we want? Justice! When do we want it? Now!” and “If we don’t get it, shut it …






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The Unlikely Candidate

An interview with Laurence Kotlikoff. It is hard to argue against the overwhelming consensus that this election has left voters choosing the “lesser of two evils” option rather than the best one. We see few glimpses of voters that feel utterly passionate about the candidate they support, in particular when one compares this to the attitudes of several million Americans prior to President Obama’s election victory in 2008. Perhaps it is understandable given the rocky, scandal-ridden, and seemingly power-hungry conceptions of the Clintons that have been perpetuated in the media, and the unpredictable, gaffe-prone, and sometimes outright nonsensical image of …






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Jeb! in the Forum

Annual Edwin L. Godkin Lecture at HKS. On Thursday, September 29, the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum at the Institute of Politics hosted Jeb Bush for the Harvard Kennedy School’s annual Edwin L. Godkin lecture. Governor of Florida from 1999 to 2007 and one of this cycle’s numerous candidates for the Republican presidential nomination, Jeb(!) left a positive impression on most of those in attendance. A visiting fellow in the Program on Education Policy and Governance at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Taubman Center for State and Local Government, Bush has distinguished himself as a leader in the realm of education …






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Faculty Council Delays Motion Against Club Sanctions

The Faculty motion against Dean Khurana’s proposed sanctions will now be discussed on November 1. Last week, the Harvard Independent reported on the faculty initiated motion that would revoke Dean Khurana’s sanctions against single gender clubs. The original motion, sponsored by Professor Harry R. Lewis, ’68 and eleven others, was originally meant to go up for discussion on October 4. However, due to certain misunderstandings over the motion during the previous week’s meeting, discussion over the motion has now been deferred. Lewis said that the October 4 meeting coincided with Rosh Hashanah, and “more than one” signatories observe the Jewish holiday. “I …






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Debate at the Epicenter

Students pack the IOP as candidates go head to head. On September 26, 2016, Harvard’s most politically engaged students gathered at the Kennedy School, the home of the Institute of Politics, to watch the first presidential debate. At 8:05 PM, five minutes after the doors of the IOP opened for the Debate Watch Party, the maximum capacity of the building was reached. Security staff fended off students eager to be in the politics and public service hub to watch the anticipated chaos. The morning after the debate found the Internet teeming with gifs, memes, listicles, and Facebook statuses from everyone …






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Harry Lewis Leading October 4 Vote Against Single Gender Club Sanctions

Harry R. Lewis ‘68 is at the forefront of a brewing faculty rebellion against Dean Khurana and President Faust’s new sanctions. Harry R. Lewis ‘68 says he had never been inside a final club until an acquaintance invited him in when he was about thirty-five. But that has not stopped him from fighting for their continued existence. And on October 4, when Dean Khurana’s proposed sanctions on single gender clubs go up for a vote amongst the faculty, he will be doing just that. From penning viral articles and blog posts to submitting motions in University faculty meetings, Lewis has …






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More Listening Than Talking

Getting to know Dean of Students Katherine O’Dair. As a nervous freshman at Miami University in the small town of Oxford, Ohio, Katie O’Dair had become accustomed to rejection. Her attempts to join the student council, the campus activities board, and an international ambassadors program had all been in vain. Though she recalls feeling “pretty down about it all”, she was thankful for the support she received from upperclassmen who encouraged her to keep seeking out opportunities to get involved, especially those about which she was truly passionate. Eventually, she found her place on campus, as a mental health counselor …






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