Prayer for Hand Sanitizer (Even When it Stings)

By MEGAN SIMS Hallelujah for viscosity (amen to that). A toast to the ambiguity of states of matter and to the bubbles that manage to stay still even when the door slams. This is a celebration of your foremothers and their menstrual blood. This is relationship anarchy, and just plain anarchy. And paper cuts. You got them on a manifesto, reading by moonlight since it’s almost full and it wasn’t too cloudy. There’s no point trusting soap dispensers, everything is sticky and the little drop of blood is creeping toward the couch. You can’t stop watching it, seems like an …






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Campus Free Speech Zones

Why you (yes, you!) should care. By EMILY HALL Amid the ongoing turmoil regarding freedom of expression on college campuses, the issue of “free speech zones” has largely stayed out of the limelight, as debate focused on safe spaces and trigger warnings has flourished. However, the existence of free speech zones is troubling to many, who consider the Bill of Rights (or at least the First Amendment) to apply universally within United States borders, regardless of one’s location. Often found on college campuses, free speech zones can refer to both periods of time and physical spaces in which student expression …






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QSA: Failing with Allyship

New policy announcement sparks criticism. By HUNTER RICHARDS This past week, Harvard College Queer Students and Allies (QSA) met for elections and engaged in a conversation about the organization’s role in political issues. The discussion ended with a vote in favor of a new policy regarding QSA’s neutrality and decision to refrain from becoming a political organization, supported by 15 attendees.  On September 13, two days after the meeting, an email was sent across the listserv to explain the new policy: QSA should remain extremely committed to advocating for LGBTQ+ students on campus and LGBTQ+ issues in the world at …






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What I’m Not

Multiraciality in an increasingly mixed world. By AUDREY EFFENBERGER To be honest, I’m a bit late to the game on this. I don’t really keep up with sports in any capacity, aside from cheering for Team USA every four years. When Colin Kaepernick started kneeling instead of standing at attention for the national anthem, I didn’t hear about it through first- or secondhand sources – I got third-, fourth-, and probably fifth-hand interpretations of what he was (metaphorically) standing for, and what that meant about the state of America. There was the one headline phrase that stuck with me, however. …






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Impractical Traditions

Are the examples we set worthy of our reputation? By HUNTER RICHARDS The Harvard Summer School has a long-standing reputation of protecting its students, particularly those still in high school taking courses on campus during the summer. However, protecting these visiting students from the traditions that Harvard students have rarely questioned and that many will have completed by the end of their sophomore year is a different matter. On the second to last Friday night of the summer school program, recent-high-school-graduate Tyler Greene failed to resurface from the Charles River after jumping from Weeks Bridge as part of fulfilling one …






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Life Without Greenhouse

With the beloved Science Center Café closed, students must find caffeine elsewhere. By CAROLINE GENTILE The closing of Greenhouse Café in the Science Center brings not only despair, but also confusion over where to procure snacks and caffeinated beverages between classes. Of course, Harvard Square boasts many respectable cafes and eateries, but these establishments are both slightly out of the way from buildings in which classes are held, and – more importantly – do not accept Board Plus as payment.  So what is a hungry and/or under-caffeinated Harvard student to do? The Indy’s got you covered! Behold, a breakdown of …






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A Safe Space for Whom?

If we are trying to be inclusive, let’s include everyone. In the last few years, Harvard and other colleges across the country have made a greater effort to be inclusive and provide safe spaces for the diverse body of students who attend these schools. I am in complete agreement with the notion that it should be – at least at Harvard – the responsibility of the undergraduate houses to provide a space in which students do not feel directly threatened (physically or emotionally) for their differences. But the problem is the current practice of “safe spaces” and general “inclusive” college …






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Making the Most of the Quad

Despite the distance, the Quad does have its perks. Harvard freshmen are inculcated with two important lessons: Your enemy is Yale, and don’t get “quadded”. The remote Quad Houses of Pforzheimer, Cabot and Currier are feared by many freshmen primarily because of the extra ten-minute hike to Harvard Yard as compared to the nine other houses by Charles River. Even though there are shuttles that connect the Quad to Harvard Square, traffic and shuttle tracking glitches can make the commute somewhat challenging. For these reasons, Housing Day anxieties run high. This year during Housing Day, members from Adams House were …






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Systems of Choice

 A discussion on student agency in house lottery.  The current generation of Harvard college students is one that grew up with the Harry Potter books by J.K. Rowling. Whether most Harvard students consider themselves fond of the books, one cannot deny that in the past 10 years or so, Harvard as a college has often been compared to aspects of the stories. It might be the comparison of Annenberg Hall to the Great Hall. In fact, just heard in the yard on Monday was a conversation between a touring millennial couple: the woman pointed to Annenberg in the distance and said, “Look, that’s the …






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Support Alongside Prevention

A personal account of sexual assault on campus.  Readers: Please be aware that the content of this article contains potentially distressing material.   The Undergraduate Council has proposed new incentives to get student groups to engage with the issue of sexual harassment and assault. Unfortunately, it’s too late for me. The skit at the beginning of Opening Days tried to teach my class about what sexual assault looked like but they left out the part where you break into hard, ugly sobs at random moments, withdraw from the people and activities you love, and cease to be your old self. …






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The Promise of Democratic Socialism?

The Indy sheds light on the wave of democratic socialism sweeping across America. Over the last few months, America has witnessed the rise of a novel political ideology in its most liberal quarters, and this volte-face comes almost as a retaliation to the excessively conservative, often bigoted rhetoric that seems to have gripped the GOP. As someone who does not have the right to vote in this country, I am not going to pretend to take a stance on which of the candidates in the present field I support; I am, however, going to try and deconstruct Mr. Sanders’ brand …






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The Harvard Brand Matters

Reflections on my interview process.   If there’s anything I learned this internship interview season, it is that the Harvard brand matters. An increasingly vocal quarter of critics have called on high school students and parents nationwide to reconsider their collective craze over selective elite universities. They say liberal arts colleges or public universities can offer as fulfilling an education at a fraction of the price in an environment with a fraction of the anxiety. But in an economy underscored by economic anxiety, it is only natural for parents and students to weigh job prospects when choosing colleges. And when …






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Dreams Realized and Dates Realigned

Stories of the dramatic Datamatch results. Valentine’s Day 2016. For some, it passed uneventfully – one Sunday among many that ended too soon and left us with those debilitating Sunday night blues. For others, it was a day spent cherishing a loved one and sharing chocolates. For a few, it was simply the day before the long-awaited celebration of our nation’s leaders. For many, here at Harvard, the day was filled with bursts of hope followed by a terrible anguish. A free Zinnekin’s waffle loomed on the horizon of this bleakest of months – and that gave us hope. Alas, …






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Nerds Rule

Some thoughts about dating people who think too much.   Cross-registration in Corporate and Financial Accounting isn’t the only thing that goes on between Harvard and MIT. If the apple of your eye happens to be a science or engineering student a couple of miles down the Charles, or if you’re a nerd yourself, you might be familiar with a few laws of attraction that have nothing to do with electrostatics. You learn so much from each other. In the spirit of Dean Khurana’s many speeches and missives, college is a transformative time to experience new things. Along the way, …






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