This is Life in Color

Harvard students celebrate Holi.   The festival of Holi marks a very special day in the Hindu calendar. It, much like most other Hindu festivals, celebrates the triumph of good over evil, of devotion over corruption, and faith over envy. The story behind the origins of this festival stems from a puranic myth about King Hiranyakashipu who plots to kill his own son, Prahlad, for not believing in his supreme authority. Prahlad, rather, is a devotee of Lord Vishnu, and is thus rescued by him from a giant fire, which instead takes the life of the King’s co-conspirator, Holika. Holika’s …






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The Promise of Democratic Socialism?

The Indy sheds light on the wave of democratic socialism sweeping across America. Over the last few months, America has witnessed the rise of a novel political ideology in its most liberal quarters, and this volte-face comes almost as a retaliation to the excessively conservative, often bigoted rhetoric that seems to have gripped the GOP. As someone who does not have the right to vote in this country, I am not going to pretend to take a stance on which of the candidates in the present field I support; I am, however, going to try and deconstruct Mr. Sanders’ brand …






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A Wicked Wardrobe

 The thin line between appreciation and appropriation.    My knowledge of Halloween before the previous weekend was limited to the various episodes of American Television shows that I had watched back home; it wasn’t that I was particularly ignorant, but just that it is not a celebration observed in most countries in the orient. This Halloween however, I was enlightened, not only by the vibrant nature of the holiday and the jubilance it added to a now-very-tiring semester, but also by the contentious debates the theme of Halloween stirred around the nation in general, and on our campus in specific. …






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In ‘Nobel’ Company 

Nobel Peace Prize winner Kailash Satyarthi comes to Harvard.  On October 10, 2014, the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced a joint Peace Prize to Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai. They called it “an important point for a Hindu and a Muslim, an Indian and a Pakistani, to join in a common struggle for education and against extremism.” While much is known of Malala’s struggle for education against the Taliban, Satyarthi’s story, unfortunately, had not received much attention before this. But ever since the prize, his work to save children from forced labor and slavery has received great appreciation around the world. …






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The Rise of Fall

Reflections on the transition to autumn.  Over the last week, the colors of Harvard have started to change hue. Gone are the bold greens of the Yard that, when juxtaposed with the bright red buildings, form the quintessential ‘Harvard’ image. They’ll be back—or so I’m told. For now, we find ourselves entering a phase that, in no time, will dovetail into an unrelenting winter. The arrival of the fall seems more than a change of seasons to me; it represents a change in the general outlook of people around campus. For most freshmen, the onset of this season is a …






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Salman Rushdie at Harvard

The Indy reports on the world famous author’s recent visit to Harvard.   Standing before a church gathering and asking people to “treat religion with the contempt it deserves” is not everyone’s cup of tea. Unless, of course, you are Salman Rushdie. Last Monday, Cantabrigians had the chance to spend an evening with the Booker-Prize winning author, as he read excerpts from his new book, Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights. Rushdie makes for a highly contentious figure in the part of the world from which I hail. It is rare to meet an educated Indian who takes to Rushdie’s …






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The New Indian Freshman in Town 

The Indy explores what it’s like to shake off nerves at Harvard.  It goes without saying that walking through the hallowed halls of a university that embodies a legacy as grand and far-reaching as Harvard can be daunting for a student hailing from a small suburban town in India. But my first few weeks on campus have also made me realize that there is more to this place that can be intimidating than the pre-colonial architecture, an almost-aggressively brilliant student body, and professors whose names are painted in revering terms on the walls of their respective fields of study. These, …






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