Song and Soul

An interview with Claire Dickson ‘19. By AUDREY EFFENBERGER Claire Dickson ‘19 is a sophomore at Harvard College, and she’s also an amazing vocalist! She’s received many jazz awards and continues to perform in Cambridge and Boston. She will perform at the Cambridge Queen’s Head Pub at 9pm on Thursday, Sept 22, 2016. We got a chance to speak with her about music, school, and life. Audrey Effenberger (AE): Let’s start with a basic question. How did you get started musically? Claire Dickson (CD): My dad is a musician, and music was always around the house. I’ve been singing ever …






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What I’m Not

Multiraciality in an increasingly mixed world. By AUDREY EFFENBERGER To be honest, I’m a bit late to the game on this. I don’t really keep up with sports in any capacity, aside from cheering for Team USA every four years. When Colin Kaepernick started kneeling instead of standing at attention for the national anthem, I didn’t hear about it through first- or secondhand sources – I got third-, fourth-, and probably fifth-hand interpretations of what he was (metaphorically) standing for, and what that meant about the state of America. There was the one headline phrase that stuck with me, however. …






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Asexy Article

An account of asexuality. By AUDREY EFFENBERGER The first time I heard someone my age say the word “sexy,” I was aghast. I probably would have used the word “aghast” at the time, too, because I had a slightly above grade level vocabulary that I was smugly proud of. “Sex” was not part of it, though. I knew what it was theoretically – 2 (or more?) people with their genitals in some configuration for enjoyment and/or procreation – but the concept didn’t register in my mind as something I should want to do. Not yet, at least. I was younger …






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By (User) Design

The Harvard Library presents newest research tool. The first thing I notice upon entering the room is a set of large posters on the wall. The next is a sheaf of pamphlets. Then, I notice the stack of business cards on the desk in front of me. I’m here to notice things, and to have people notice what I notice, which is harder to do than one might assume. How can user experience be quantified? This is the work of the Harvard Library User Research Center. I’m at the URC to participate in a study on the design of a …






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Concentration Conversations

Freshmen and faculty go through Advising Fortnight.     Despite the last snow on the first day of the season, it seems that all of the traditional signs of spring have finally arrived. Daffodils and other early bloomers can be spotted around the campus. Allergies have returned, if measured by the trumpeting of a thousand noses and the sprouting of HUHS flyers in the dining hall. Changing wardrobes are heavily supplemented by pajamas worn to Lamont as the second wave of midterms and papers arrives. Finally, of course, Advising Fortnight has begun. Whereas the fall was heralded with sophomore concentration …






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Nerds Rule

Some thoughts about dating people who think too much.   Cross-registration in Corporate and Financial Accounting isn’t the only thing that goes on between Harvard and MIT. If the apple of your eye happens to be a science or engineering student a couple of miles down the Charles, or if you’re a nerd yourself, you might be familiar with a few laws of attraction that have nothing to do with electrostatics. You learn so much from each other. In the spirit of Dean Khurana’s many speeches and missives, college is a transformative time to experience new things. Along the way, …






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A heArtLifting Story

An interview with Liz Powers ‘10, co-founder of ArtLifting. Homelessness is not a very happy subject. The reality is that over seven thousand people in Boston – one in a hundred of the city’s population – lack stable housing and live in shelters or on the streets, according to the Boston Public Health Commission’s Annual Homeless Census. And that number is rising. From 2014 to 2015, the homeless population rose by five percent. In that same time, the number of families experiencing homelessness increased by 25%. These, and other sobering statistics, illustrate the depressing realities of the problem. However, there …






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References to Salvador Dalí Make Me Hot 

A Review of the Fall 2015 Visiting Director’s Project in the Loeb.  Sometimes, life is awkward. Sometimes, you have to go to the Harvard Box Office and say a very strange play title with a very straight face. Sometimes, you walk through the wrong door trying to get to the mainstage of the Loeb Drama Center, and sometimes you trip over your shoes trying to walk to your seat. But when the Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club (HRDC) puts on a truly stunning opening performance of References to Salvador Dalí Make Me Hot, as they did this past Friday night, there’s absolutely …






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Moonlit Poetry 

The Indy reviews Speak Out Loud’s ‘Celestial Open Mic.’  A semicircle of cold faces, cold toes, and cold fingers.  A cold night across the concrete of the Science Center observatory. Faces shadowed by rear floodlights, faces lit by the waxing moon and a single smartphone screen. A voice. A mic. A quiet murmuring of snaps, rising against the stillness. Spoken word is a powerful thing. From formal speech and rhetoric to song, theater, and simple dialogue, the capacity to communicate and connect through sound resonates throughout our culture. Harvard Speak Out Loud (SOL) knows this well. SOL provides safe spaces—no …






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Whose bad idea is the best bad idea? 

The Indy explores a competition for bad science ideas. The crowd roars with laughter as Daniel Harris explains that the reason we can’t hear our own heartbeats is that they’re too catchy, and we wouldn’t have survived because we can’t ignore a funky beat. This is not your average comedy act. This is BAHFest. Properly known as the Festival of Bad ad Hoc Hypotheses, BAHFest is a symposium of utterly ridiculous but ridiculously well argued hypotheses concerning evolution. This past Saturday, BAHFest was totally sold out as six speakers delivered their implausible, yet well-evidenced claims to a panel of four …






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